Sourdough Boule

Sourdough….I just can’t stop making breads using my starter. Easy ones that taste wonderful are my go to right now. It’s still amazing to me what flour, salt, and water can do when given time!

This recipe makes 2 loaves. Feel free to halve everything if you want to only make 1 loaf. Or you could prepare the dough, then divide into two and make 2 different breads, one filled, one plain, like I usually do.

Remember to start the evening before as the dough needs to rest overnight to develop it’s structure and flavor. This doesn’t require much hands on time but a lot of resting/proofing time. Work it around your schedule, refrigerating the dough if you have to delay baking more than an hour after shaping, up to 8 hours. It’s all well worth it.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup starter

3 cups water

8 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting

1 tablespoon salt

Procedure:

1. Mix the starter into the water in a large bowl. Add the flour and salt and stir to combine. Cover with a dish cloth and let rest for about 30 minutes to 1 hour.

2. Lightly shape into a ball by pulling the sides in, and rotating the dough 1/4 turn. Do this 4 times, and cover again with a dishcloth or plastic wrap. Leave at room temperature overnight, until doubled in size.

3. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Divide into 2 equal parts.

4. Working with one half at a time, dimple the dough using your floured fingers. Shape into a ball again and roll the dough with both hands to create a taut surface.

5. Place the dough, seam side up, into a bowl lined with a towel that is sprinkled generously with flour. Cover and let rise until double, about 1 hour.

*You could also refrigerate the dough, covered, if you are not yet ready to bake, for at least 2 hours. Remove from the refrigerator right before preheating the oven.

6. Preheat oven to 450F. Remove the cover from your dough and place a big piece of parchment paper over your dough. Invert the bowl carefully onto your hand. Place on the counter and rub dough lightly with flour. Score using a lame or a razor blade. Place into the dutch oven, cover, and place in the oven. Bake for 20 minutes, uncover then bake for another 20-25 minutes. Remove from dutch oven and cool completely on a wire rack.

Sourdough Boule

  • Servings: 2 loaves
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

One of the easiest Sourdough Boule recipe ever, you just have to remember to start it the night before. A versatile recipe, you can use this as a base for filled batards too!

Ingredients

1/2 cup starter

3 cups water

8 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting

1 tablespoon salt

Directions

Mix the starter into the water in a large bowl. Add the flour and salt and stir to combine. Cover with a dish cloth and let rest for about 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Lightly shape into a ball by pulling the sides in, pressing down, and rotating the dough 1/4 turn. Do this 4 times, and cover again with a dishcloth or plastic wrap. Leave at room temperature overnight, until doubled in size.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Divide into 2 equal parts.

Working with one half at a time, dimple the dough using your floured fingers. Shape into a ball again and roll the dough with both hands to create a taut surface.

Place the dough, seam side up, into a bowl lined with a towel that is sprinkled generously with flour. Cover and let rise until double, about 1 hour.

*You could also refrigerate the dough, covered, if you are not yet ready to bake, for at least 2 hours. Remove from the refrigerator right before preheating the oven.

Preheat oven to 450F. Remove the cover from your dough and place a big piece of parchment paper over your dough. Invert the bowl carefully onto your hand. Place on the counter and rub dough lightly with flour. Score using a lame or a razor blade. Place into the dutch oven, cover, and place in the oven. Bake for 20 minutes, uncover then bake for another 20-25 minutes. Remove from dutch oven and cool completely on a wire rack.

Updated 10/19/2020


Sourdough Starter

I had always wanted to bake with sourdough. I remember a magazine I had a long time ago that had a picture of grapes on top of a flour/water mixture to make a starter. I cannot remember what that magazine was otherwise I will search for and buy it, if only for that page and the recipe!

When my son was in 4th grade learning about the Oregon Trail, we started reading articles about it at home. My interest in sourdough was revived around that time when I read about a century old starter in Oregon, Carl Griffith’s 1847 Oregon Trail sourdough starter, and wanted it immediately. I mean, they say that this is a hundred seventy years old and that is fascinating to me. It survived for so long! I can only imagine baking with the same sourdough they used at that time. I’m sort of a nerd, yes, I am aware of that fact. You can read all about the Carl Griffith’s 1847 Oregon Trail Sourdough Starter here: http://carlsfriends.net

I wondered if I could try and use this as I had been making bread with yeast forever. I am aware that different places would have different strains of local flora, yeasts and bacteria, therefore I wasn’t sure I’ll get the exact thing even if I revived this particular starter.

I asked a Facebook group “Perfect Sourdough” if anyone was familiar with this. Some were but they mostly encouraged me to just make it as “it would be ready by the time you get the Carl’s starter anyway.”

So I sent for the Carl’s sourdough starter, and at the same time, armed with almost everything I read from that group and online, started my own Rancho Santa Margarita 2017 sourdough! 😊

It took me 5 days total to get a bubbly starter. I placed my container on top of the refrigerator for extra warmth as it was December 14 when I began this little experiment. I used an easy to follow recipe that only ever uses 1 cup flour to 1/2 water to feed the starter. Note that this makes a 100% hydration starter.

Preparing your own Sourdough Starter:

Day 1: In a jar, crock or plastic bucket (1 quart is a good size!) place 1 cup whole wheat flour (or rye) and 1/2 cup water. Mix well, and cover loosely. Place on top of your refrigerator for 24 hours.

Day 2: Discard top half (about 1/2 cup) of the starter and add 1 cup unbleached all purpose flour and 1/2 cup water to the remaining half in the container. Stir well, cover loosely and leave overnight on top of the refrigerator. *My starter had a crusty, dried out top and that was what I discarded. *

Day 3: By now, there will likely be bubbles in the mixture. If so, feed every 12 hours (2x a day), removing half of the sourdough and feeding using 1 cup unbleached all purpose flour and 1/2 cup water each time. If it doesn’t have bubbles, feed just once today.

Day 4-5: Repeat feedings twice a day. On days 4-5 the starter should’ve doubled and bubbled all over. If not, continue feeding twice a day until it reaches this point (days 6-7). My starter was ready on day 5. Lots of bubbles and it doubled in less than 8 hours. *Note that I initially did not bake bread with my starter even though it was ready. I kept feeding it and using the discards for waffles and crepes. I wanted a strong starter prior to attempting to make bread. I believe the starter was about 2 weeks old when I first used it to make bread.

Once it’s ready, remove half of the sourdough and feed it once more. Leave for about 6 – 8 hours and take how much you’ll need for your recipe.

*NOTE that up until this time your starter will always be at room temperature. I kept it on top of my refrigerator for warmth.*

TIPS:

*If your recipe calls for more than 1 cup of starter, give it a couple of feedings without discarding, until you’ve made enough for your recipe plus 1/2 cup to keep and feed again.

*OR collect the discards in a jar in the refrigerator until you get 1 cup, about 2 feedings.

*If you’ve got nothing but 1 tablespoon left, that’s okay too! This happened to me more than once. Just feed it as usual and watch it spring back to life. It might take a couple of feedings but it will spring back. This also goes for if you forgot about it for a few weeks. Just scoop out the top portion and get at least a tablespoon to place in a clean jar. Feed with 1/2 cup water and 1 cup flour then leave at room temperature until bubbly.

Maintaining a Sourdough Starter:

After taking what you need for a recipe, transfer the remaining half of starter to a container. Feed this starter with 1 cup of flour and 1/2 cup water, cover loosely, and let it rest at room temperature for 4-8 hours. It would have doubled in volume and have a domed top. Sides would show bubbles trapped in the dough. *I read somewhere that you can put the just fed starter straight into the refrigerator if you’re not using it for the next few days. Have not tried it this way but the logic was that it would still feed, but slower since the refrigerator is cold.*

If you are not using the starter: Store this starter in the refrigerator after it has doubled. and feed it regularly: 1 cup flour and 1/2 cup water, about once a week, after removing half for “discard”. Always remove at least half so that the amount of flour and water you give it will be enough for it to feed on. Leave it at room temperature for a few hours after feeding, then store in the refrigerator until needed.

TIP: place a rubber band on the container to mark the starting volume, that way you’ll know when it doubles with just a glance!

If you are baking with the starter: Take the amount you need and transfer to your mixing bowl. To the starter remaining in the container, add 1 cup flour and 1/2 cup water. Stir and cover loosely, let sit at room temperature for 4-8 hours, until doubled. *Once in a while, remove the starter from the container to a clean bowl. Wash the sourdough container and rinse very well. Dry and then return the sourdough and feed it. Leave at room temperature until doubled, 4-8 hours.*

What To Do With Discards:

Just because they’re called “discards” doesn’t mean you have to chuck them. You do not need to throw way the discard sourdough once your sourdough is ready. I collected them in a separate container in the fridge in the beginning but now I just use them right away. There are plenty of recipes online for crackers, waffles, pancakes, pizza, pretzels, etc. that will make use of these dough instead of wasting them.

TIP: DO NOT discard your sourdough down the drain. It will clog. If you absolutely have to dump it, place it in the trash can. That is your last resort….after trying all discard recipes and asking everyone you know if they want to start baking with sourdough.

King Arthur Flour is a great place to find recipes for sourdough and for discards. Link here: https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/collections/sourdough-discard-recipes

Sourdough English Muffins:

https://athomewiththeresa.com/2019/07/06/sourdough-english-muffins/

Sourdough Waffles:

https://athomewiththeresa.com/2019/10/08/sourdough-waffles/

Sourdough Baguettes:

https://athomewiththeresa.com/2019/07/05/sourdough-baguettes/

Sourdough Crepes:

https://athomewiththeresa.com/2020/03/04/sourdough-crepes/

*My Carl’s Sourdough did arrive about 2 weeks after I started my own starter. It is now my dehydrated back up in case something goes wrong with the one I am using. I just don’t think I can take care of 2 different sourdoughs as I don’t bake everyday.*

Sourdough breads
Waffles

Sourdough Starter

  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

An easy to follow tutorial to grow your own sourdough starter at home!

Directions

Day 1: In a jar, crock or plastic bucket (1 quart is a good size) place 1 cup whole wheat flour(or rye) and 1/2 cup water. Mix well, and cover loosely. Place on top of your refrigerator for 24 hours.

Day 2: Discard top half (about 1/2 cup) of the starter and add 1 cup unbleached all purpose flour and 1/2 cup water to the remaining half in the container. Stir well, cover loosely and leave overnight on top of the refrigerator.

Day 3: By now, there will likely be bubbles in the mixture. If so, feed every 12 hours(2x a day), removing half of the sourdough and feeding using 1 cup unbleached all purpose flour and 1/2 cup water each time. If it doesn’t have bubbles, feed just once today.

Day 4-5: Repeat feedings twice a day. On days 4-5 the starter should’ve doubled and bubbled all over. If not, continue feeding twice a day until it reaches this point (days 6-7). My starter was ready on day 5. Lots of bubbles and it doubled in less than 8 hours.

Once it’s ready, remove half of the sourdough and feed it once more. Leave for about 6 – 8 hours and take how much you’ll need for your recipe.

TIPS:

*If your recipe calls for more than 1 cup of starter, give it a couple of feedings without discarding, until you’ve made enough for your recipe plus 1/2 cup to keep and feed again.

*OR collect the discards in a jar in the refrigerator until you get 1 cup, about 2 feedings.

*If you’ve got nothing but 1 tablespoon left, thats okay too! This happened to me more than once. Just feed it as usual and watch it spring back to life. This also goes for if you forgot about it for a few weeks. Just scoop out the top portion and get at least a tablespoon to place in a clean jar. Feed with 1/2 cup water and 1 cup flour then leave at room temperature until bubbly.

Maintaining a Sourdough Starter:

Transfer the remaining half of starter to a container. Feed this starter with 1 cup of flour and 1/2 cup water, cover loosely, and let it rest at room temperature for 4-8 hours.

Store this starter in the refrigerator after and feed it regularly: 1 cup flour and 1/2 cup water once a week, after removing half for “discard”. Leave it at room temperature for a few hours after feeding, then store in the refrigerator until needed.

Sourdough Waffles

Waffles (or pancakes) and sausages, bacon and scrambled eggs, fresh fruit, yogurt parfait.., I look forward to lazy weekend breakfasts starting Monday morning!

I try to make weekend breakfast a little more special since everyone is pressed for time on a weekday. We enjoy eating together without rushing, or thinking about where we have to be next. I love waffles and enjoy making them right before eating so that they’re still crunchy on the outside when you bite into them.

I have always used a big Kitchenaid Professional double waffle maker that makes them bigger than my face. Sometimes though I want a smaller Eggo sized waffles to put in my son’s lunch box. I saw this Dash Waffle maker for $10 at Target and had my doubts as it’s so cheap, but also, it’s because of the price that I figured I got nothing to lose. It’s the perfect size for a breakfast sandwich (waffles, egg, sausage) so i bought it.

I’m happy to tell you that it makes good waffles and if you consider the price, it’s an excellent value for your money! My big Kitchenaid waffle maker is now reserved for when i need to make waffles real fast as it takes 1 cup of batter per waffle.

My little Dash waffle maker takes 1/8 cup batter per waffle to make the perfect crispy on the outside, tender inside waffle! I let it cook a few seconds after the ready light shuts off.

Start this the night before and you’ll have perfect waffles for breakfast the next day!

Ingredients:

1 cup discard starter

1 cup unbleached all purpose flour

1 cup buttermilk or yogurt

1 tablespoons sugar

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

3/4 teaspoon baking soda

$10 Dash waffle maker

Procedure:

1. The night before serving, mix discard starter, flour, buttermilk, and sugar in a large bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature overnight.

Dough after resting overnight.

2. In the morning, preheat waffle maker.

Add the rest of the ingredients.

3. Add egg, salt, vanilla, vegetable oil, and baking soda to the mixture and mix thoroughly.

Mix well.

4. Place an appropriate amount of batter in the waffle maker and close. This Dash Waffle Maker takes 2 tablespoons (1/8 cup) batter. Cook until done, 1-5 minutes depending on your waffle maker.

1/8 cup batter is the perfect amount for this waffle maker.

5. Serve hot with syrup, butter, jam, bacon, sausage, eggs…whatever you would like!

Done! Golden and crusty!

Sourdough Waffles

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Prepare the night before for easy, delicious weekend morning treat!

Ingredients

1 cup discard starter

1 cup unbleached all purpose flour

1 cup buttermilk or yogurt

1 tablespoons sugar

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

3/4 teaspoon baking soda

Directions

  1. The night before serving, mix discard starter, flour, buttermilk, and sugar in a large bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature overnight.
  2. In the morning, preheat waffle maker.
  3. Add egg, salt, vanilla, vegetable oil, and baking soda to the mixture and mix thoroughly.
  4. Place an appropriate amount of batter in the waffle maker and close. Cook until done, 1-5 minutes depending on your waffle maker.
  5. Serve hot with syrup, butter, jam, bacon, sausage, eggs…whatever you would like!

Enjoy!

#ad “As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission from qualifying purchases”. For the Dash waffle maker, click here:

For the Dash mini griddle, click here:

Sourdough English Muffins

Sourdough English Muffin

06.05.2019

Taking a mini vacation after our vacation…and i want to eat fresh bread. However it is the day after 4th of July and it’s just a bit too hot to turn on the oven.

English muffins made in the Thermomix to the rescue! These little rounds of bread smell and taste the same as a loaf baked in the oven but it cooks on the stovetop griddle. And since its going to be made in the Thermomix, it’s going to come together pretty fast and easy.

Since my sourdough starter has been neglected for a couple of weeks and was fed when we got back, it’s the perfect timing to make some sourdough english muffins. 

Start this recipe the night before as it needs to rest overnight to develop really nice flavors and let sourdough do it’s magic. 

Makes 20 english muffins

Place the following in the Thermomix bowl:

1 cup sourdough starter

2 cups milk 

2 – 3 tablespoons sugar or honey

4 cups of flour 

Cover with lid and set to Knead for 3 minutes. Leave covered and allow to rest overnight (at least 8 hours).

The next day, stir down the dough and add the following to the bowl:

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoons salt

1 1/2 cups flour (plus more as needed)

Cover with lid and knead for 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides and check if it needs more flour. Add more if needed (up to 1/2 cup) until you have a manageable dough. It should be soft but not too sticky. Cover and knead for 1 minute more if necessary.

Tip bowl over to a floured surface and rest for a few minutes. 

Roll dough out to 1/2 inch thickness and cut using a 3 inch round cutter.  Place in baking sheets dusted with cornmeal or semolina flour, leaving enough space so that they won’t touch as they rise. When done, sprinkle tops with cornmeal, or semolina flour, too. 

Cover with a damp towel and rise for about an hour, until doubled.

Preheat a griddle or fry pan on medium low. Lightly grease with butter and carefully transfer the dough to the griddle. I used a dough scraper to make transferring it easier. I was able to fit 5 rounds in my 12 inch pan.

Let cook for about 5 minutes, turn over and cover for another 5 minutes.

Transfer to a cooling rack to cool slightly before eating. Enjoy with butter and jam, or eggs, bacon, cheese, ham, etc. 

To check out the Thermomix, click on this link: https://shop.thermomix.com

Sourdough Baguettes

Thermomix Sourdough Baguettes 

Sourdough baguettes made in the Thermomix! How easy is that? In this recipe I will show you exactly how to do it. All you need is patience and time!

This recipe makes 4 baguettes. I figured since I’m going through the same process whether I’m making 2 or 4 baguettes,  I’ll just make 4. They keep pretty well. However if you only want 2, just halve everything.  

You will need the following:

For the baguettes: 

5 cups organic, unbleached all-purpose flour

1 tablespoons salt

1 1/2 cups sourdough starter

1 1/2 cups water

Other useful tools: 

Cooking oil (to grease the bowl)

a baguette tray or parchment-lined baking tray

a lame or a razor blade

a spray bottle

ice cubes, optional

Procedure: 

Place flour, salt, starter, and water in the Thermomix mixing bowl. Cover with the lid and measuring cup. Turn the settings to Knead and timer to 3 minutes.

To make without a Thermomix: stir flour, salt, starter, and water in a large mixing bowl. Mix until a shaggy dough forms. Knead in the bowl, adding flour as needed, for about 10 minutes. Continue with the recipe.

Remove the mixture from the bowl and place it on a floured work table and shape it into a ball. Let the dough rise in a well-oiled bowl, covered, in the refrigerator overnight.

Remove from the refrigerator and allow it to warm up at room temperature for about 2 hours.

Divide the dough into 4 pieces, about 12 oz each, and stretch them into tight baguette shapes. Place each one on a baguette tray or a parchment-lined baking tray. Cover the baguettes and let them rise until they have doubled in size, about 4 hours.

Preheat the oven to 450° F. Spray the baguettes lightly with water using the spay bottle. Using a lame or a sharp razor blade, slash the tops of the loaves diagonally 3 or 4 times (this will allow them to expand more easily while baking).

Place the loaves in the oven and immediately spray them, and the inside of the oven, with water. Repeat this step after about 5 minutes of baking. Alternatively, you can toss in some ice cubes on the floor of the oven.

Bake the loaves 25–30 minutes, until they are golden and the crust is crisp.

To check out the Thermomix, click on this link: https://shop.thermomix.com