Sourdough Focaccia

We have been making homemade pizza for a few years now and it’s become a staple that I have 2 outdoor pizza ovens at the moment.

I also make our sourdough bread every week and need to switch it up with a few varieties using different flours, inclusions, or liquid to flavor the bread. Marshmallow stout instead of water for a chocolate chip sourdough batard anyone??

Between bread and pizza, there’s also focaccia! And here is a very easy recipe complete with a timeline to guide you!

You can split this in half crosswise to use for sandwiches, or just cut into squares, or rectangles to eat as is! Dip in olive oil, Trader Joe’s Garlic dip, hummus, baba ganoush…..It’s crunchy and soft, salty and herby…just delicious specially when still warm from the oven.

I use really good olive oil and salt as I believe it contributes to the overall taste of the focaccia. The olives are dry cured from Trader Joe’s, tomatoes and rosemary are from the backyard.

I doubled the recipe and made 2 13”x9” focaccia to eat and have enough to trade with a dozen home grown eggs. So please don’t be confused by the discrepancy between the instructions and the photos. 😊

I hope you will like this recipe as much as we did!

Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/At-Home-With-Theresa-100255438410727/

Ingredients:

423 grams all purpose flour

181 grams bread flour

460 grams water

11 grams salt, plus more for sprinkling

115 grams starter, I used one straight from the fridge

12 grams good quality olive oil, plus more for drizzling

Toppings of choice, chopped herbs, olives, tomatoes, etc.

Procedure:

1. 10 am to 11 am

In a large bowl, mix flours, water, salt and starter. Mix with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula until the dough comes together.

Set aside for about 15 to 30 minutes to allow the flour to absorb the water.

Then mix the dough thoroughly, drizzling in the olive oil and pulling the dough up until well mixed. Use a plastic bench/dough scraper to help you pull up the dough and mix the oil in.

Cover (I use a plastic hair cover!) and set aside for 30 minutes

#1

2. Bulk 11:15-1:15

#2
#3

Perform 4 sets of stretch and fold every 30 minutes, for 2 hours.

Photos 1 – 4 are the stretch and fold in the first 30 minutes, #2 at an hour, #3 at an hour and thirty minutes, and #4 was after 2 hours, the last of 4 folds. See how stretchy and smooth the dough looks after?

#4

3. Proof 1:15- 5:15

Pour some olive oil in a 13 x 9 inch pan.

Transfer dough to the pan and cover.

Every 30 minutes on the first hour, uncover the dough and stretch gently to fill the pan.

Cover and let rest for the remainder of the 4 hours.

4. Preheat oven to 450F.

5. Drizzle the dough with about 2 -3 tablespoons of good olive oil.

6. Wet your finger tips and dimple the dough all the way to the bottom of the pan, multiple times.

7. Sprinkle with chopped herbs, olives, capers, cherry tomatoes, sun dried tomatoes, caramelized onions, etc.

*I used halved cherry tomatoes, chopped rosemary, olives, and Maldon sea salt. The other focaccia had the same toppings except it did not have tomatoes, as I only got a handful from the garden.*

8. Sprinkle with good quality salt.

9. Bake in the preheated oven for 30 to 35 minutes, until golden brown.

*After baking, tops should be golden and edges crusty.

*Bottom should be toasted. This looks perfect!

Cut for sandwiches, this is what the crumb look like on my bake. Yummy!

Home made Natto (Fermented Soybeans)

Have you heard of, or even maybe TRIED, Natto (fermented soybeans)?

When you see it in Japanese or other Asian grocery stores, they come in a package of 3 little white, styrofoam boxes. It is usually served with rice in Japanese meals, most often breakfast. You stir it well to make it super stringy and slimy, add the tiny mustard and soy sauce packets that come with it, and pour everyting over hot rice. Then, you dig in!

It is for sure an acquired taste, even for those who grew up eating Japanese food. You either love it or loathe it. However, with all the fermented food craze lately, I read that it is added to everything, and I even saw it used to top a pizza! Now that is something I have to try! 😋

I prefer to use these small, organic soy beans when making natto and soy milk. The ones at the grocery stores are bigger, but are okay to use too.

So, in this post, I will show you how to make this super healthy, fermented food at home. In case you are like me and my mom, who happen to love natto, you can have an unlimited supply if you make it.

You will need an incubator that can keep a constant temperature of 100C. You can use an oven, a proofing box for bread making, or an Excalibur Dehydrator.

A few years ago, I purchased a Japanese Yogurt maker specifically because you can adjust the temperature, unlike the ones available here in the US. The brand is Tanika and it is really a handy little appliance that I always use to make my homemade natto. Of course, I also have an oven, an Excalibur dehydrator, and a Brod and Taylor Folding Bread Proofer, but I do not like warming up that much space for a little jar of natto. So this little yogurt maker is just perfect for me. Labels on the appliance and the manual are in Japanese but I recently saw some on Amazon that are made for the US market with English labels.

Just like yogurt, you need to buy a package first to be able to get the bacteria you need to make natto, then if you make it regularly, you just get a little from the prepared batch to make more. This is the easiest way to get started. Of course, you could also buy some natto spores to start the Bacillus Subtilis culture. Mitoku is the brand I use. It’s from Japan and makes really tasty natto. It comes with a tiny measuring spoon so you get a lot of natto even though the culture bottle is tiny.

Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/At-Home-With-Theresa-100255438410727/

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups soybeans, preferably organic

Water

Store bought natto, or natto spores

Procedure:

1. Rinse 1 1/2 cups of soybeans in water and soak in at least 5 cups of water overnight at room temperature.

*the soybeans will more than double its size, see photo below, so make sure you use a lot of water when soaking the beans.*

A dry soybean on the left. After soaking for 12 hours, it will look like the one on the right.
I use this footed strainer basket with a handle to steam the soybeans in an Instant pot.

2. Rinse and strain soybeans and place in a metal footed strainer basket (or a colander over a trivet).

3. Pour 1 1/2 cups water in the pressure cooker liner.

4. Place the strainer with soybeans in the pressure cooker and pressure cook for 45 minutes.

5. Let pressure drop for 10 minutes, then release pressure, placing a kitchen towel over the vent to help dissipate the steam.

Cover the vent with a clean towel. I just took a photo to show the release of pressure.
Soybeans after cooking for 45 minutes.

6. In the meantime, prepare your yogurt maker.

7. Place 1/4 cup of water in the Tanika Yogurt Maker’s inner container, place the spoon inside and cover with the clear cover.

8. Position the spoon so that the handle sticks out of the cut out in the cover.

9. Microwave for 1 minute and 30 seconds to sterilize. Dump out the water.

10. If using the natto spores, mix 2 teaspoons boiled and cooled water with 1 tiny spoonful (included in the spores box) of the culture. Mix well and set aside.

*water mixed with natto spores*

11. Take one soybean and squeeze it between two fingers, it should be soft enough that it will crush easily.

12. Transfer half of the hot soybeans in the prepared yogurt container.

13. A. *If using spores, pour the half of the diluted culture over the hot soybeans.

13. B. If using ready made natto, add a spoonful of it onto the hot soybeans. Stir with the sterilized spoon.

14. A. *Add the rest of the soybeans to the yogurt container and then the rest of the diluted culture, if using spores. Mix well.

14. B. *If using pre made natto, add a spoonful more to the soybeans, then mix throughly.

15. Make sure to mix well, but be careful not to crush the beans.

16. Set the container into the yogurt maker, cover with a clean towel and place the blue cover over, slightly ajar to allow air in.

17. Set the fermentation temperature to 45C and the timer to 24 hours.

18. Carefully remove the blue cover and check the beans after 24 hours.

19. They should have a white, fuzzy growth around most of the beans.

20. Cover with the clear cover then the blue screw, and refrigerate for at least 24 hours before eating.

*this is how it looks like from the bottom of the container.

21. Take a big spoonful of the natto and place on a serving dish. Cover and return the rest to the refrigerator. Using a spoon or chopsticks, thoroughly mix the natto until stringy and slimy. I was told to stir vigorously 100 times! Add a little soy sauce and hot mustard, serve over hot plain rice. Enjoy!

Raisin, Walnut, and Cinnamon Swirl Sourdough Batard

This recipe is a variation of the sourdough boule recipe. The raisins and walnuts give it enough sweetness and flavor to enjoy on its own. Of course, with butter and jam it is even better!

Ingredients:

1 cup raisins

1 cup walnuts

1/2 cup starter

3 cups water

8 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting

1 tablespoon salt

melted butter or water

2/3 cup brown sugar

4 teaspoons good quality ground cinnamon

Procedure:

Soak raisins and walnuts in enough water to cover.

Mix starter into the water in a large bowl. Add the flour and salt and stir to combine. Cover with a dish cloth and let rest for about 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Drain the raisins and walnuts well and knead into the dough. Cover and let rise overnight.

Divide the dough into two and turn out onto a floured board.

Working with one at a time, stretch out the dough to a rectangle, about 16×8 inches. Brush with melted butter or plain water. Mix together brown sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and sprinkle evenly on the dough. Roll up, from the short end, pinching edges to seal as you go along.

Place in a flour dusted banetton. Repeat with the other half.

Cover and let rise for an hour, until puffy.

Preheat oven to 450F. Cut a piece of parchment bigger than your banetton. Place the parchment over the dough and invert onto your hand. Place on the counter and score 3 times, using a razor, or a lame. Place into a dutch oven, cover and place in the middle rack of the preheated oven. Bake for 20 minutes covered, then 35 minutes more uncovered.

Place on a wire rack to cool. Cool completely before slicing.

Raisin, Walnut and Cinnamon Sourdough Batard

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

A delicious variation for the basic sourdough boule recipe. This yield loaves that are just sweet and flavorful enough to enjoy on its own.

Ingredients

1 cup raisins

1 cup walnuts

1/2 cup starter

3 cups water

8 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting

1 tablespoon salt

melted butter or water

2/3 cup brown sugar

4 teaspoons good quality ground cinnamon

Directions

Soak raisins and walnuts in enough water to cover.

Mix starter into the water in a large bowl. Add the flour and salt and stir to combine. Cover with a dish cloth and let rest for about 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Drain the raisins and walnuts well and knead into the dough. Cover and let rise overnight.

Divide the dough into two and turn out onto a floured board. Working with one at a time, stretch out the dough to a rectangle, about 16×8 inches. Brush with melted butter or plain water. Mix together brown sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and sprinkle evenly on the dough. Roll up, from the short end, pinching edges to seal as you go along.

Place in a flour dusted banetton. Repeat with the other half.

Cover and let rise for an hour, until puffy.

Preheat oven to 450F. Cut a piece of parchment bigger than your banetton. Place the parchment over the dough and invert onto your hand. Place on the counter and score 3 times, using a razor, or a lame. Place into a dutch oven, cover and place in the middle rack of the preheated oven. Bake for 20 minutes covered, then 35 minutes more uncovered.

Place on a wire rack to cool. Cool completely before slicing.


Sourdough Boule

Sourdough….I just can’t stop making breads using my starter. Easy ones that taste wonderful are my go to right now. It’s still amazing to me what flour, salt, and water can do when given time!

This recipe makes 2 loaves. Feel free to halve everything if you want to only make 1 loaf. Or you could prepare the dough, then divide into two and make 2 different breads, one filled, one plain, like I usually do.

Remember to start the evening before as the dough needs to rest overnight to develop it’s structure and flavor. This doesn’t require much hands on time but a lot of resting/proofing time. Work it around your schedule, refrigerating the dough if you have to delay baking more than an hour after shaping, up to 8 hours. It’s all well worth it.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup starter

3 cups water

8 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting

1 tablespoon salt

Procedure:

1. Mix the starter into the water in a large bowl. Add the flour and salt and stir to combine. Cover with a dish cloth and let rest for about 30 minutes to 1 hour.

2. Lightly shape into a ball by pulling the sides in, and rotating the dough 1/4 turn. Do this 4 times, and cover again with a dishcloth or plastic wrap. Leave at room temperature overnight, until doubled in size.

3. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Divide into 2 equal parts.

4. Working with one half at a time, dimple the dough using your floured fingers. Shape into a ball again and roll the dough with both hands to create a taut surface.

5. Place the dough, seam side up, into a bowl lined with a towel that is sprinkled generously with flour. Cover and let rise until double, about 1 hour.

*You could also refrigerate the dough, covered, if you are not yet ready to bake, for at least 2 hours. Remove from the refrigerator right before preheating the oven.

6. Preheat oven to 450F. Remove the cover from your dough and place a big piece of parchment paper over your dough. Invert the bowl carefully onto your hand. Place on the counter and rub dough lightly with flour. Score using a lame or a razor blade. Place into the dutch oven, cover, and place in the oven. Bake for 20 minutes, uncover then bake for another 20-25 minutes. Remove from dutch oven and cool completely on a wire rack.

Sourdough Boule

  • Servings: 2 loaves
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

One of the easiest Sourdough Boule recipe ever, you just have to remember to start it the night before. A versatile recipe, you can use this as a base for filled batards too!

Ingredients

1/2 cup starter

3 cups water

8 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting

1 tablespoon salt

Directions

Mix the starter into the water in a large bowl. Add the flour and salt and stir to combine. Cover with a dish cloth and let rest for about 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Lightly shape into a ball by pulling the sides in, pressing down, and rotating the dough 1/4 turn. Do this 4 times, and cover again with a dishcloth or plastic wrap. Leave at room temperature overnight, until doubled in size.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Divide into 2 equal parts.

Working with one half at a time, dimple the dough using your floured fingers. Shape into a ball again and roll the dough with both hands to create a taut surface.

Place the dough, seam side up, into a bowl lined with a towel that is sprinkled generously with flour. Cover and let rise until double, about 1 hour.

*You could also refrigerate the dough, covered, if you are not yet ready to bake, for at least 2 hours. Remove from the refrigerator right before preheating the oven.

Preheat oven to 450F. Remove the cover from your dough and place a big piece of parchment paper over your dough. Invert the bowl carefully onto your hand. Place on the counter and rub dough lightly with flour. Score using a lame or a razor blade. Place into the dutch oven, cover, and place in the oven. Bake for 20 minutes, uncover then bake for another 20-25 minutes. Remove from dutch oven and cool completely on a wire rack.

Updated 10/19/2020


Sourdough Waffles

Waffles (or pancakes) and sausages, bacon and scrambled eggs, fresh fruit, yogurt parfait.., I look forward to lazy weekend breakfasts starting Monday morning!

I try to make weekend breakfast a little more special since everyone is pressed for time on a weekday. We enjoy eating together without rushing, or thinking about where we have to be next. I love waffles and enjoy making them right before eating so that they’re still crunchy on the outside when you bite into them.

I have always used a big Kitchenaid Professional double waffle maker that makes them bigger than my face. Sometimes though I want a smaller Eggo sized waffles to put in my son’s lunch box. I saw this Dash Waffle maker for $10 at Target and had my doubts as it’s so cheap, but also, it’s because of the price that I figured I got nothing to lose. It’s the perfect size for a breakfast sandwich (waffles, egg, sausage) so i bought it.

I’m happy to tell you that it makes good waffles and if you consider the price, it’s an excellent value for your money! My big Kitchenaid waffle maker is now reserved for when i need to make waffles real fast as it takes 1 cup of batter per waffle.

My little Dash waffle maker takes 1/8 cup batter per waffle to make the perfect crispy on the outside, tender inside waffle! I let it cook a few seconds after the ready light shuts off.

Start this the night before and you’ll have perfect waffles for breakfast the next day!

Ingredients:

1 cup discard starter

1 cup unbleached all purpose flour

1 cup buttermilk or yogurt

1 tablespoons sugar

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

3/4 teaspoon baking soda

$10 Dash waffle maker

Procedure:

1. The night before serving, mix discard starter, flour, buttermilk, and sugar in a large bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature overnight.

Dough after resting overnight.

2. In the morning, preheat waffle maker.

Add the rest of the ingredients.

3. Add egg, salt, vanilla, vegetable oil, and baking soda to the mixture and mix thoroughly.

Mix well.

4. Place an appropriate amount of batter in the waffle maker and close. This Dash Waffle Maker takes 2 tablespoons (1/8 cup) batter. Cook until done, 1-5 minutes depending on your waffle maker.

1/8 cup batter is the perfect amount for this waffle maker.

5. Serve hot with syrup, butter, jam, bacon, sausage, eggs…whatever you would like!

Done! Golden and crusty!

Sourdough Waffles

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Prepare the night before for easy, delicious weekend morning treat!

Ingredients

1 cup discard starter

1 cup unbleached all purpose flour

1 cup buttermilk or yogurt

1 tablespoons sugar

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

3/4 teaspoon baking soda

Directions

  1. The night before serving, mix discard starter, flour, buttermilk, and sugar in a large bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature overnight.
  2. In the morning, preheat waffle maker.
  3. Add egg, salt, vanilla, vegetable oil, and baking soda to the mixture and mix thoroughly.
  4. Place an appropriate amount of batter in the waffle maker and close. Cook until done, 1-5 minutes depending on your waffle maker.
  5. Serve hot with syrup, butter, jam, bacon, sausage, eggs…whatever you would like!

Enjoy!

#ad “As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission from qualifying purchases”. For the Dash waffle maker, click here:

For the Dash mini griddle, click here: