Microwave Mochi

Microwave mochi was one of the food that me and my coworkers at Brentwood made one fun day.

I purchased a few of the microwave Mochi makers from Marukai (now Tokyo Central) in Gardena, CA. We brought in boxes of Mochiko rice flour, sugar, and any filling we want to eat! There was strawberries, mangoes, coconut, chocolate, peanut butter, truffles, peaches, blueberries….anything and everything you can imagine.

We made batches upon batches and quickly formed the hot mochi into little balls with our chosen filling inside. Then quickly pop it in our mouths. We had an hour lunch so we had time to make our mochi and enjoy it too.

I really like the mango filled ones that I then rolled in desiccated coconut. That was yum!

So here I’m sharing the basic recipe! It’s easy to make and takes 5 minutes or 9 minutes depending in which method you follow!

You’ll need:

Microwave Mochi

1-1/2 cups mochiko (rice flour)
1-1/2 cups water
1/2 cup sugar
Pinch salt
Katakuriko (potato starch) or kinako (roasted soybean flour), for dusting
1 cup tsubushi an (mashed bean paste) or koshi an (smooth bean paste)

Lightly coat a microwavable tube cake pan with cooking spray.

Mix mochiko, water, sugar and salt in a bowl.

Pour mixture into pan and cover with plastic wrap or a microwave cover.

Microwave 3 minutes on low, then 3 minutes on medium and 3 minutes on high, for a total of 9 minutes.

OR microwave on high for 5 minutes.

Cool in microwave 5 to 10 minutes, then turn onto a baking pan sprinkled with katakuriko, kinako, or cornstarch. Cut into 16 pieces using a plastic knife.

Dust hands with katakuriko or kinako and flatten each piece. Place 1 tablespoon an (or any filling of your choice) in center of each piece. Bring edges together and pinch to seal. Shape as desired.

Note: This recipe is based on microwave wattage of 1,000. Depending on your microwave wattage, cooking time may need to be adjusted.

Variations

>> Add fresh strawberries, peanut butter or sweet chestnut covered with bean paste.
>> For chocolate flavor, stir 1/4 to 1/3 cup melted chocolate chips into mochi batter before cooking.
>> Add a few drops of food coloring into batter for color variation.
>> A few drops of flavoring (strawberry, grape, orange, blueberry, etc.) may also be added.

Electric Lunchbox #91: Strawberry Nesquick Mochi

I always have this big can of Nesquick Strawberry mix as my son loves it mixed in his morning mug of milk. I started buying it when I was pregnant, as I didn’t like chocolate then, so was happy to see they offered it in strawberry flavor! It was the only way i could drink milk then. I guess it got passed on to my son! 😊

When I was making the mochi recipes for the ELB, I happened to see the can of Nesquick and immediately thought of using it as flavoring. And here is the result of the experiment!

I would add more Nesquick next time as the flavors and color was minimal. Otherwise, the mochi was chewy, sweet, and delicious enough for a snack.

*NOTE that this recipe uses regular sized measuring cups, NOT the tiny ELB cup, unless specified.*

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Ingredients:

1/2 cup mochiko rice flour

1/4 cup sugar

2- 3 tablespoon Nesquick Strawberry drink powder

1/2 cup water

Katakuriko or cornstarch for dusting

Procedure:

1. In a bowl, mix rice flour,

2. Sugar,

3. Nesquick powder,

4. And water,

5. Mix well until blended.

6. The mixture will be thin, see photo below.

7. Spray the medium or large ELB bowl with nonstick spray.

8. Pour mochi mixture into the bowl. Cover with foil and place in the ELB base. Pour 3 ELB cups of water in the base, cover and let steam until it shuts off, about an hour.

9. Carefully open the ELB, and check if mochi is set. Add more water to the base and steam longer if needed.

10. Dust the top with katakuriko or cornstarch.

11. Turn out onto a plate dusted generously with katakuriko or cornstarch.

12. Using a plastic knife, cut mochi into bite sized pieces.

13. Dust with more katakuriko or cornstarch to prevent sticking.

14. Enjoy!

Electric Lunchbox #86: Jello Mochi

While experimenting with the mochi recipes using pudding mix to add flavor, I can’t help but notice the Jell-O packages next to the pudding mixes at the grocery store shelves. I am aware that there are more flavors of gelatin available than pudding, so a lightbulb went off immediately!

I picked up one that sounds so delicious – mango passion fruit! I only got a pack but now I wished I got more. It tastes like Hawaii…if ever Hawaii was a flavor!

I tried making 2 bowls of mochi at a time in my Itaki Jumbo but it didn’t work out so I recommend you only make one bowl at a time, using the big ELB bowl. This way, the steam can concentrate on cooking your Mochi properly.

When I made two, the cooking time was way too long (I was up to 5 ELB cups of water!) and still, it wasn’t cooked through. So I decided to scrap those and start over with only one batch at a time. It worked out better so please try it this way. If you notice the photos, it will show the small ELB bowl. I forgot to take photos of the time I made it using the big ELB bowl, except for when it was done.

*NOTE that this recipe uses regular sized measuring cups, NOT the tiny ELB cup, unless specified.*

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Ingredients:

1/2 cup mochiko

1.5 oz (3 tablespoons) jello mix, any flavor you want (I used Mango Passion Fruit)

2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 cup hot water

Katakuriko

1. Place rice flour in a small bowl.

2. Add Jell-O mix,

3. Sugar….

4. And the hot water….

5. Mix everything well until there is no visible clumps and mixture is smooth.

6. Spray the ELB bowl with a nonstick spray.

7. Pour the mixture in and cover with foil. Set the bowl in the ELB base. Add 3 ELB cups of water to the base.

8. Covers and let steam until it shuts off, about an hour. Carefully open the ELB and check if the Mochi is pulling off the sides and set in the middle. Add more water and steam a bit longer if needed.

9. Dust top of the mochi with kinako, katakuriko, or cornstarch.

10. Dust a plate with kinako, katakuriko, or cornstarch.

11. Run a spatula around the mochi and gently release it from the ELB bowl onto the prepared plate.

12. Dust with more kinako, katakuriko, or cornstarch. Then cut into pieces using a plastic knife.

13. Dust with more powder if needed. Cool completely. Enjoy!

Tiger Mochi Maker

One of the ladies at an ELB group I’m in mentioned a blogger making mochi like I did at the beginning of the year. Since I am making some that day, I figured I’ll just write about it too.

The holidays got a bit too busy to catch up with writing recipes (even though it was the perfect time as kitchens all over are definitely churning out yummy goodies non stop!). But I was able to snap photos (and videos!) along the way and I hope you’ll enjoy this read! Oh the beautiful chaos in the kitchen!

Mochi is traditionally eaten in Japan during New Year’s, it is added to soups like Ozoni, (made with chicken, vegetables and mochi) or Zenzai (sweet red bean soup with soft mochi pieces swimmimg around!) we also have kiri mochi, which is made from pounded sweet rice shaped into bars and dried. You toast them and dip in soy sauce. Yummy!! I like all those but I love stuffed mochi even more!

I had always used this brand of sweet rice so I’m not sure if there is any other brand out there. Filipino cuisine uses a sweet, sticky rice too but the appearance is different. These ones are almost round and the “malagkit” rice is more elongated. Not sure if they are interchangeable as I have both and never tried to replace one with another.

For my New Year’s mochi, I start the process a day before I want to cook and pound the rice.

I use 10 cups of rice. This is the maximum amount this mochi maker can handle and since I’ll be bringing some over to my mom, I figured I’ll just make a big batch. You HAVE to use the rice measuring cup that came with the mochi maker. Do not lose it!

Wash the rice thoroughly, until water runs clear. To do this, you place the measured rice in a big bowl, fill with water and run your fingers through it. I try to gently rub the grains together too. Drain and refill the bowl. Do this several times. Then fill the bowl with water one last time. Soak for at least 6 hours, ideally overnight.

After soaking, drain the rice and place in a strainer for 30 minutes. This is important as you do not want the rice too wet which will make your mochi too soft.

Add 2 1/2 cups water in the base of the mochi maker. This amount corresponds to the amount of rice you’ll cook. There is a chart in the manual. Reminder that you HAVE to use the cup that came with the machine to measure both the rice and the water.

Next, attach the bowl, twisting to set it in place. Place the impeller in the bowl turning until it settles in.

Carefully place the drained rice to the bowl.

Level out the top if needed.

Place the plastic cover over the bowl.

Press “steam”. It will steam until the reservoir runs out of water. When it is done, the buzzer beep loudly. Press “off”.

Remove cover, test rice for doneness. You should be able to crush it between two fingers.

Press “pound” and start a timer. This time, you DO NOT use the cover. It’ll take about 10-15 minutes. See the videos below to help you estimate the texture.

This is what the rice looks like in the beginning.

After a few minutes, a ball starts to form and the texture starts to look smoother.

In about 12 to 15 minutes, you would have a homogenous, smooth looking ball.

There should be no rice grains visible, just one smooth, white mass.

Sprinkle katakuriko (or cornstarch)on the cover or a clean board.

Invert the hot mochi onto the prepared surface.

Lift the hot bowl with pot holders and gently nudge all of the delicious mochi out of the bowl. Go ahead and taste some! I pinch a few pieces here and there and fill with an. See the last photo! Work (and eat!) quickly as this mochi hardens really fast.

You can roll them in the tray, sprinkling with katakuriko or cornstarch as needed.

Or you can transfer them into 2 plastic, one gallon freezer bags, snipping both sealed ends so you can roll the mochi all the way to the corners.

Leave bag open after rolling to dry the mochi a little. I leave it for several hours, turning it over and loosening the plastic a couple of times. Then remove from bag, cut into pieces and let dry a few more hours.

Store these in the freezer as it will get moldy rather fast at room temperature.

To serve, toast the squares until puffed and toasty. I use my toaster oven for this but a pan on the stove over low to medium heat, or even just microwaving till it puffs up, are both good too. Dip in lots of soy sauce and enjoy!

Mochi stuffed with An. 😋

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Electric Lunchbox #84: Pistachio Mochi

A lovely variation to the previously posted recipe for Banana Cream Mochi https://athomewiththeresa.com/2021/01/11/electric-lunchbox-83-banana-cream-pudding-mochi/

After this experiment, I can say now that you can use any flavor pudding you like to make whatever flavor chichi dango you like! I am looking at chocolate 😋 but am still wondering if it’ll be chocolatey enough…one day I’ll try it!

In the meantime, try this Pistachio version. Mildly flavored but yummy nonetheless! Very pretty light green color too!

The pudding mix I got had little pieces of pistachio nuts in it. It was delicious but be careful if you have allergies in your household like we do.

*NOTE that this recipe uses regular sized measuring cups, NOT the tiny ELB cup, unless specified.*

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Ingredients:

1/2 cup mochiko rice flour

1/4 cup sugar

1 tablespoon Pistachio flavored Instant Pudding

1/2 cup water

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract or paste

Katakuriko (potato starch) or kinako (roasted soybean flour)

3 ELB cup water to steam

Procedure:

1. Spray the medium or large ELB bowl with nonstick spray.

2. In a bowl, place rice flour,

3. Sugar,

4. Pistachio pudding mix. Mix.

5. Pour in water,

6. and mix until blended.

7. Pour mixture into the prepared bowl.

8. Cover with foil and place in the ELB base. Pour 3 ELB cups of water to the base. Cover and let steam until it shuts off, about an hour.

9. In the meantime, dust a plate with some katakuriko (potato stach), or corn starch.

10. Carefully open the ELB and check the mochi. It should look like it is pulling away from the sides of the bowl, and looks a little dry and set in the middle. Pour off any pooled water.

11. Run a knife along the edges to loosen the mochi. Invert onto the prepared plate and gently nudge it out using a rubber or silicone spatula.

12. Dust tops with more katakuriko or cornstarch.

13. Cut into bite sized pieces and roll in more katakuriko.

14. Cool completely and enjoy!

Electric Lunchbox #83: Banana Cream Mochi

I didn’t realize a lot of you like Mochi as much as I do! Because of that, I’ll feature a few more Mochi recipes so you guys can make it at home!

These are called Chichi Dango, colorful, sometimes flavored, little pieces of chewy, yummy, rice-based Japanese sweets. It is made with sweet rice flour, sugar, water, pudding mix powder, and vanilla. After done, it will be super sticky so you roll it in kinako, which is toasted soy bean flour. If that is not available, use katakuriko – potato starch. If you still don’t have that, you can use tapioca or cornstarch.

I found some banana cream flavored instant pudding mix so I used that for this recipe. I hope you like this!

*NOTE that this recipe uses regular sized measuring cups, NOT the tiny ELB cup, unless specified.*

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Ingredients:

1/2 cup mochico rice flour

1/4 cup sugar

1 tablespoon instant banana cream pudding and pie filling

1/2 cup water

1/2 teaspoon vanilla paste or extract

1/4 cup kinako, katakuriko, tapioca starch or cornstarch

Procedure:

1. Spray bowl with nonstick spray.

2. In a bowl, place mochiko,

3. sugar,

4. Banana cream flavored instant pudding mix,

5. water,

6. and vanilla paste.

7. Mix well until blended completely.

8. Pour mixture into prepared bowl. Cover with foil and place in the ELB. Add 3 ELB cups of water to the base, cover and let steam until it shuts off, about 1 hour.

9. Carefully open the ELB and check if the mochi is pulling from the edges and top looks dry. Sprinkle the top lightly with kinako or katakuriko .

10. Using a sturdy rubber or silicone spatula, run it around the edges of the mochi and then run it under to release it from the bowl. Invert onto a plate sprinkled with kinako or katakuriko.

11. Sprinkle top with more kinako or katakuriko.

12. Using a plastic knife, cut the mochi into bite sized pieces.

13. Dust with more kinako or katakuriko to prevent them from sticking to each other.

14. Serve and enjoy!

Electric Lunchbox #81: Daifukumochi or Daifuku

Happy New Year’s Day my friends!

Here’s to hoping 2021 will behave and allow us to go back and do what we used to do – enjoy life with people that matter, get together with family, eat together, and travel all over collecting memories to cherish forever.

Back to food…and ELB…today I will show you how to make one of my favorite sweets in the ELB.

Daifukumochi or daifuku (literally “great luck”), is a Japanese sweet made from sweet rice flour. It is formed into a round mochi then stuffed with sweet filling, most commonly anko, sweetened red bean paste made from azuki beans and sugar. Daifuku is a popular wagashi in Japan, and often served with green tea.

I made this in the ELB since mochi is traditionally served for New Year in Japan. The actual mochi for New Year’s is a block of pounded sweet rice, which cannot be made in the ELB. I do have a mochi maker, it cooks the soaked rice and pounds it perfectly so you don’t have to. All I do is pat it into a rectangle and slice. Then eat, of course! 😊

This sweet mochi is served all year round as a snack. I love eating it and I can finish a package of 6 in one sitting. It’s that good! Or bad….

You can also wrap a clean, dry, fresh strawberry with the red bean paste before wrapping in the mochi. That is a real treat specially if the strawberry is ripe and sweet.

I hope you enjoy this little Japanese dessert/snack! I tried to make it real easy using readily available ingredients. 😊

*NOTE that this recipe uses regular sized measuring cups, NOT the tiny ELB cup, unless specified.*

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Ingredients:

1/2 cup mochiko rice flour

2 1/2 tablespoons sugar

Pinch salt

1/2 cup water

Katakuriko (Potato starch), for dusting

1/4 cup red bean paste

3 ELB cups water for the base

Procedure:

1. Place the rice flour in the large ELB bowl.

2. Add the sugar and salt next.

3. Pour in water.

4. Slowly stir the mixture.

5. Keep stirring until the mixture becomes thick and well blended.

6. Cover the bowl with foil and place the bowl in the ELB base. Pour 3 ELB cups of water in the base, cover and let steam until done, about 1 hour.

7. In the meantime, pour some katakuriko (potato starch) in a plate and set aside.

8. Roll up a tablespoon or so of red bean paste into balls. Make 4 of these. Set aside.

9. When the ELB shuts off, carefully open it and drain any liquid on top of the mochi.

10. While hot, divide the mochi into 4 pieces using a butter knife. D

11. Dust your fingers with katakuriko.

12. Working quickly, while the mixture is hot, scrape 1 portion of the mochi into your hands and stretch it out a little.

13. Place 1 red bean paste ball in the middle and pull edges over, pinching to seal. Roll into a ball, dusting with katakuriko as needed.

*I was rushing to leave when I made this so apologies for the irregular shapes. It took me less than 5 minutes from the time I took the mochi from the ELB to taking this final photo. I might re do the photo when I get another chance to make these leisurely *

14. Give the mochi one final roll in the katakuriko, place on a serving dish, and devour!

Electric Lunchbox #80: OTHER GRAINS – Pearl Barley, Job’s Tears (Adlai), and Brown Rice

We are on the last week of 2020! Starting your New Year’s resolution early? I have 3 new grains that you can have instead of rice to help with your “eat better” resolution!

A lot of you have been asking me if I made alternative grains in the ELB. I usually do not, as I have several different cookers that do this very efficiently.

Shuttle Chef thermal pot

The one I use most often for beans and other grains that require a long cooking time is a thermal cooker. I have 2 of these, a Zojirushi and a Shuttle Chef, both of which are made in Japan. It looks like a cooking pot within another pot. It’s easy to use, you boil your food in the inner pot on the stove and after the contents come to a full boil, you just place it in the outer thermal pot and leave for as long as you need to. No electricity, no gas. It keeps cooking even if you leave it overnight but doesn’t overcook everything to a mush. Very efficient.

However, all these requests did pique my curiosity as I do see the usefulness of using the ELB for little portions.

So here it is! I do have more whole grains that I use regularly like rye, kamut, and hulled barley etc. so wait for those too! 😊 I will post it if it is doable in the ELB.

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1. Pearl Barley

Perfectly cooked Barley!

This is the brand I had in the pantry at the moment. I usually order 25 pound bags from Azure Standard, but the delivery is only once a month and it hasn’t arrived yet.

To prepare Pearl Barley:

1. Measure 1 ELB cup pearl barley into your ELB bowl. The medium or large ELB bowl is good for this. Rinse the grains and drain.

2. Add water. If you want your barley not too soft, (like if adding the cooked barley to soup later) 1 full ELB cup of water is enough. Add 2 ELB cups of water if you want the grains softer.

3. Place the bowl in the ELB base, then add 3 ELB cups water to the base. Cover and let steam until it shuts off, about 1 hour.

4. Check the grains for doneness. Add more water to steam longer if needed. You might have to drain any left over water if you used more than a 1:1 ratio.

5. Fluff the grains and serve hot.

2. Job’s Tears

Job’s Tears/Adlai also known as coix seed, Chinese pearl barley, or hato mugi in Japanese, can be found in well stocked Chinese, Korean, or Japanese groceries here in Southern California. It is grown and consumed in different forms in Asia.

They do look like pearl barley, but they are rounder, kind of heart shaped, and have a more distinct flavor.

To prepare Job’s tears:

1. Add 1 ELB cup of Job’s tears in the ELB bowl. Both the medium or large ELB bowl can be used. Rinse well and drain.

2. Add 2 ELB cups of water to the bowl. Place the bowl in the ELB base and add 3 ELB cups of water to the base. Cover and let steam until it shuts off, about 1 hour.

3. Check the grain for doneness and drain if needed. Add more water to steam longer if needed.

4. Fluff and serve hot.

3. Brown Rice

This is the less processed version of white rice, with more fiber and nutrients. Brown rice is the whole grain rice with just the inedible outer hull removed. White rice is the same grain without the hull, the bran layer, and the cereal germ. Brown rice does need more water and time to cook well but is more chewy and flavorful than plain white rice.

To prepare brown rice:

For brown rice, You can use the medium or large ELB bowl. I use the large one most of the times I tested though, as it needs more water and I do not want water overflowing into my ELB base.

1. Place 3 ELB cups of brown rice in the large ELB bowl. Rinse well and drain.

2. Add 5 ELB cups of water and place the bowl in the ELB base.

3. Add 3 ELB cups of water to the base and let steam until it shuts off, about 1 hour.

4. Check grain for doneness. Add more water to steam longer if needed.

5. Fluff and serve hot!

I hope you guys enjoyed this post! Let me know if you are interested in knowing hoe to cook the other grains I use.

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